Director Sharon La Cruise Discusses the Film, “Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock.

Film maker Sharon La Cruise. From PBS.

Last week’s Friday Video was a preview of the upcoming film Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock.  Today on the University of Arkansas campus director of the film, Sharon La Cruise, will preset the film and answer questions.

Yesterday Ozarks at Large’s Antoinette Grajeda spoke with La Cruise about the making of the film including her research in Little Rock, her quest to discover why Daisy Bates was not initially seen as potential leader of the movement, Bates’s life as a social and political radical, and a her role in the desegregation of Central High.

“Daisy Bate’s life” La Cruise says, “is the classic example that life really is like ten percent of what happens to you and ninety percent of how you handle it.  Because that is how she lived her life because she could have had many options as far a path she could have went down considering where she came from and what she went through.  And she made a decision to do good with her life.  I’m hoping she’ll be inspirational to young adults….”

To listen to the entire interview go here and click on the link.

In case you missed the Friday Video here it is again.  Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock will be airing nationally on February 2nd at 9:00 pm on the PBS series, Independent Lens.  The presreening will be held today at 2:00 PM at the Reynolds Center on the U of A campus.   The event is hosted in connection with Martin Luther King Jr. week and organized by the University Libraries and Diversity Affairs.

Comments

  1. […] Ms. La Cruise injects first-person musings into the film that sit awkwardly, but she also finds side stories that elevate her movie above mere hagiography. Ms. Bates’s aggressiveness on integration was divisive for the state’s black leaders, and that she was a woman meant she was pushing against more than just racial barriers. […]

  2. […] Ms. La Cruise injects first-person musings into the film that sit awkwardly, but she also finds side stories that elevate her movie above mere hagiography. Ms. Bates’s aggressiveness on integration was divisive for the state’s black leaders, and that she was a woman meant she was pushing against more than just racial barriers. […]