Human Rights Archive

Meet the Growers: Violet Bullock

If you’re a regular reader of this column, you know that for the past year the McElroy House: Organization for Cultural Resources and Community Action has been working on something we’re calling the Garden Book Project. This book will feature the stories of area growers both old and young. More than just a directory or
Category: Arkansas

Trail of Tears 175th Anniversary

Earlier this week the Cherokee Nation marked the 175th anniversary of the arrival of the final group of Cherokees into what is now the state of Oklahoma Arriving on March 24, 1839, this final detachment marked an ending to the Trail of Tears. According to historians, the term Trail of Tears most likely originated with
Category: Arkansas

Created Equal Film Series

Arkansas Tech University, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities, is hosting a film series entitled Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle. Two films have already been shown—Slavery by Another Name and The Loving Story-–but community members still have an opportunity to catch the final two films before the series ends on April
Category: African American History

Beautiful Souls: The Courage and Conscience of Ordinary People in Extraordinary Times

At the close of 2013 I picked up a copy of the 2012 publication Beautiful Souls: The Courage and Conscience of Ordinary People in Extraordinary Times. Recently released in paperback and written by journalist Eyal Press, this 196-page book follows the stories of four everyday people who chose to stand up in the face of
Category: Book Review

Loving Place, Culture, and Identity: A Recollection of Another Folklore Conference

Contributor Nic Hartmann recently attended the annual meeting of the American Folklore Society and offers this discussion of two powerful presentations, reminding readers what it means to love the local and the importance of translating conferences addresses into everyday action.   Were you at AFS this year? We’d love to hear your thoughts on these talks
Category: Community Action

Why I’ll Be Marching: Alex Handfinger on Southerners United for Dignity and Reform

On October 12th Arkansans will come together to march for immigration reform. Organized by the Southeast Immigrants Rights Network in partnership with Arkansas United Community Coalition, and coinciding with a two-day conference to be held at Philander Smith College in Little Rock, two simultaneous marches will take place across the city beginning at 3:00 pm—one
Category: Arkansas

Don’t Forget About Arkansas: March for Immigration Reform in Dardanelle, Arkansas

  A few weeks ago the Arkansas United Community Coalition Held a rally in Dardanelle, Arkansas calling for immigrant reform. They picked the small town of Dardanelle because it’s home to congressman Tom Cotton, the Republican who’s running against Senator Pryor in the upcoming state senate race. Rallies are relatively common in places like Little
Category: Arkansas

The Seed of Sally Good’n: A Black Family of Arkansas 1833-1953

Published by the University Press of Kentucky, The Seed of Sally Good’n: A Black Family of Arkansas 1933-1953 traces the descendants of a woman named Sally, a young African and Cherokee slave who was purchased by Taylor Polk from the Cherokee community near Fort Smith in the late 1920s. Taylor Polk, a prominent landowner in Montgomery
Category: African American

“No One Here Should Ever Go Hungry:” Harmony Gardens

We recently wrote about an upcoming workday taking place at Harmony Gardens in Russellville, Arkansas. I had a chance to attend to the workday and learn a bit more about the people operating the garden and the motivations behind their work. Located on two large corner lots belonging to the First United Methodist Church in
Category: Arkansas

Equality, Hoover’s Idea for Land Reform, and the Flood of 1927

As part of a continuing partnership with the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture, this week’s column is a follow up to a recent piece on one of the state’s worst natural disasters, the Flood of 1927. The flood resulted in hundreds of deaths, destroyed crops, and left around 750,000 southerners without food, water, clothing,
Category: African American