What the Children Will Expect of Us: A Living Room Conversation

Last week a coalition of several organizations and individuals across the south launched a media campaign calling on white people in small towns and rural areas to stand up against white supremacy and break through the cultures of silence surrounding race and racism. Our media campaign is just the first step in our collective long
Category: Arkansas

We Make the Road by Walking: Standing Up Against Silence and Hate

Today in a little community called Zinc, Arkansas, the KKK is beginning their week-long training camp. Open to people ages 16 and up, the camp seeks to build “a mighty army” to take back the white race from what they describe as “racial genocide.” I live about three hours away from the klan camp, and
Category: African American History

Central Arkansas Delegation for Worker Democracy

The central Arkansas delegation is now safe in sound in Massachusetts at the Eastern Conference for Workplace Democracy! They’re learning all kinds of amazing things and will be bringing all this knowledge back to the larger community in the near future! Thanks so much to everyone who helped to support getting them there. If you’re
Category: Arkansas

The Children Will Expect This of Us: A Response to the Rebel Ride

    This short piece was submitted as a letter to the editor of the Courier newspaper  (hence the short length) on behalf of the McElroy House: Organization for Cultural Resources.  This coming Sunday there will be a Rebel Ride at Old Post Road Park in response to recent national calls to remove the Confederate flag
Category: African American

Building Cooperative Movements in Central Arkansas: Here’s How You Can Help!

Last month Little Rock native Ed Whitfield visited Little Rock for a series of events and conversations around building solidarity economies. The event was organized by Datule Artist Collective, the Women’s Project and, Little Rock Collective Liberation. His public talk, “Blood, Bones, and Dirt,” focused on the long history of slavery and capitalism while also
Category: Arkansas

What it Takes To Notice What’s Always Been There: Catalpa Stories

Around this time last year I was not-so-patiently awaiting the birth of my daughter. She was about a week overdue and I was round and tired. The catalpa flowers were scattered all over the yard, their sweet smells crushed under my sons’ hyper feet. I mark my mother’s death by the arrival of the monarchs
Category: Uncategorized

Here is Where We Must Begin: Water, Drought, and Flowers

This column was originally published in ABOUT the River Valley magazine and it part of a long-standing series with the publication. The banks of the Arkansas river are over flowing. Last week the water went up past the basketball goals in downtown Dardanellle and all the low water bridges have washed out. The wetlands in
Category: ABOUT the River Valley

“Documenting Culture in the 21st Century:” Symposium at the American Folklife Center

As part of our work at the McElroy House: Organization for Culture Resources, and in connection with the work we do through the Boiled Down Juice, founder Meredith Martin-Moats has been invited to speak at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress as part of a symposium entitled, “Documenting Culture in the 21st
Category: Folklife

Friday Video Myles Horton: Radical Hillbilly

Here’s some Friday inspiration. Myles Horton was one of the founders of the Highlander Research and Education Center, most widely known for its role in the civil rights movement and in the Appalachian People’s Movements. He was interviewed by Bill Moyers in 1981 where he discusses his childhood, the creation of Highlander, and his theories
Category: Community Action

To Love Your People: Ways to Counter The Russellville KKK-Sponsored Billboard

  This column was originally published in the Courier newspaper in Russellville, Arkansas. Russellville has been in national news in recent weeks over a billboard recently placed at Exit 81. It reads “It’s NOT racist to love your people.” There’s a link to something called “White Pride Radio,” a KKK hosted site with programing about
Category: African American History